Moths, call out fees and mountain climbing in the French Alps.

For last few weeks we have put up with poor TV reception but the situation became quiet dire over the last 48 hours with channels dropping off like old people in a nursing home during a heat wave. 

So after attempting to scale my above-average height roof with my average height ladder, I was left with only two choices. Invest in grappling equipment and climbing ropes, or call in a professional who was likely to own a range of ladders and have the knowledge to fix the issue once on the roof and faced with the antenna.

Despite my interest in scaling the French Alps during the next northern winter, I chose to call Brian the antenna guy. Brian is a bloke skilled the art of antenna installation and husbandry. He came out and told us he could fix our problem with his big ladder for only $90. He also told us it would cost me an extra $90 for calling him out. This was his call out fee. 

Life is full of these “call out fees”. Not always financial, they are the hidden cost of getting things done, sorted or fixed. Something you may not have been aware of before entering into the situation, but you now have to wear the cost. 

It could be that dream job with the nightmare boss, the excellent house with the sub-par neighbors, the compromise to keep the relationship alive or the support undergarment to pull off that dress. They strike throughout the course of life, springing on us like a panther and always at a time when we can probably least bear it. If you are not careful it can bankrupt your perspective and destroy your motivation. But they need to be endured if we want to get things done.

I have been accused of being more glass half empty than full, that I see moths where others see butterflies. I would say that I am neither optimist nor pessimist, that I am a realist. Some folk will say that a realist is just a pessimist in a nice suit. They’ll also be the very same people who tell you that life isn’t black and white but shades of grey. I then ask them to take note of the colour of the suit Mr. Realist is wearing.

As one year ends and another begins, my hope and prayer is that the forthcoming days are not just the start of another year, but a whole new era. As you look to TCB (take care of business) this new year, may it be one filled with more butterflies than moths, few call out fees, crisp TV reception and mountain climbing trips in the French Alps.