About Christmas savings

Lately my four year old has taken a break from Lego to go back to playing with his Duplo blocks (Lego's evil younger sibling).

His favourite game is to build towers of blocks stacked high towards the ceiling. Soon enough they get too high for him to reach and the game loses its fun, so it becomes about making them crash down.

Archer, and many property developing billionaires worldwide, understand that it is far easier to condemn something than it is to save it.

There is a tension within all humans between condemning and saving. We see it when we talk about historical buildings, when voting for contestants on TV cooking shows or walking between the death rows of animal shelters looking at all the unadopted strays. 

The choice to condemn or save is inherent to our existence.

That is what I love about Christmas. We have hope. Our lives don't need to eventually topple like a tower of Duplo.

In the Christmas story, we hear about the birth of the foretold Messiah, the saviour, in Jesus Christ. It is the story of God’s son taking human form and living amongst us.

There is a bible verse that talks to this. It is the one made famous by wrestlers and the crazy Christians who stand on street corners yelling at people (this is because normal Christians won’t hang out with them). 

John 3:16 goes “For God so loved the world that he gave his only son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life.”

But for me, the verse that follows is better. 

John 3:17 says “For God did not send his son into the world to condemn the world, but in order that the world might be saved through him.”

The Christmas story, along with this verse, talks of a God who wants to save the world, not condemn it. When you add up all the suffering, wars, illness and environmental decay; you could question the point.

But God sees the people and places of this world as worth saving. He isn't just creating some Duplo world that he will one day grow tired off and destroy. He wants to take all that is good and save it. So much so that he gave his Son the mission of being that saviour.

God:  Jesus, put down the X Box and come here. I am going to make you Saviour of the World.
Jesus: Cool!
God: Now you are going to have to go to Earth and live amongst the people as a human…
Jesus: Cool! Do I get to eat pasta?
God: Probably. But thereis one catch…
Jesus: Oh yeah what’s that?
God:  Eventually you’ll have to sacrifice your life for humanity.
Jesus: Oh…but I’ll get to eat pasta before that right?

The Christmas story reminds me that God thinks we are worth saving. His plan started with sending his saviour son in the form of a baby boy born on Christmas day...or thereabouts. We are open to discussion on that one!

My hope is that this Christmas you’ll embrace the idea that things are worthy of saving. Whether that is in the form of relationships, a few dollars at the sales, some cold meats for boxing day or even just you.

Merry Christmas.